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Rain clogs morning commutes

ATLANTA -- The much-needed rain that soaked metro Atlanta Wednesday morning caused several problems on local roads.

11Alive meteorologist Chesley McNeil says the rain should continue through mid-morning.

RELATED | 11Alive Traffic Jam
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11Alive Weather

Bartow County

A tractor trailer ran off the road on northbound I-75 near the Main Street exit. The Georgia Department of Transportation reported a diesel fuel leak and damage to a guardrail in this accident. The highway has since reopened.

Cobb County

Cobb County officials report slow-moving water on southbound I-75 at the ramp to eastbound I-285.

DeKalb County

Ga. high school students take longer to earn diplomas

ATLANTA -- A new method of calculating graduation rates reveals that more high school students are dropping out than had been previously counted and some of them are taking five or even six years to earn a diploma.

According to reports the new formula was released last week. It shows that Georgia's 2011 graduation rate dropped 13 percentage points using the calculation, to 67.4 percent.

RELATED | Compare graduation rates by school

Chick-fil-A to host mother-son 'Date Knight'

Chick-fil-A to host mother-son 'Date Knight'

ATLANTA -- All of the Chick-fil-A restaurants in metro Atlanta will host a special mother-son Date Knight on Saturday, Apr. 28.

The Date Knight format will be similar to that of the franchise's massively popular Daddy-Daughter Date Nights. It will give mothers and sons a special chance to enjoy some quality time together.

The event will have a medieval theme, hence the "Knight" part of its title.

"One of Chick-fil-A's goals is to promote community connections and enrich the lives of everyone we come in contact with," Robin Lomax, Chick-fil-A area marketing director, said in a statement. "We understand the importance of mother-son relationships and want to encourage local moms to come to Chick-fil-A, enjoy their sons' company over a meal and have fun."

Threat of wildfires soars in Ga.

Threat of wildfires soars in Ga.

ATLANTA -- Forecasters warn the threat of wildfires is high across much of Georgia, and any fires that develop will likely spread rapidly.

The National Weather Service issued a red flag warning for high fire danger from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday.

The warning covers north and central Georgia, where winds are expected to gust up to 25 mph. Forecasters say humidity will be low, helping to create potentially dangerous fire conditions.

In metro Atlanta, brush fires poured smoke on interstates on Tuesday, causing poor visibility. Firefighters in DeKalb County battled blazes along I-20 and I-285.

Bones found in 1993 not Cherokee woman

Bones found in 1993 not Cherokee woman

MARIETTA, Ga. -- What was once one mystery is now two mysteries.

The latest DNA technology has determined that skeletal remains unearthed in Marietta are not those of a 36-year-old Acworth woman who disappeared in 1992.

Marietta Police said they are back to square one trying to identify the remains.

"This is someone's mother, someone's sister, definitely someone's daughter that they may not have had contact with in over 20 years," Officer David Baldwin said.

The remains were found on June 25, 1993 by construction workers who were building the Brentwood Park subdivision on Allgood Road. For years, investigators believed the remains belonged to Belinda Norred.

Norred was last seen at the mobile home park where she lived. She vanished more than a year before the skeleton was unearthed.

Investigators believed the remains belonged to Norred because they had been at the site for over a year.

TRUTH TEST | Will the TSPLOST spur the economy?

ATLANTA -- A new ad supporting a penny sales tax that would fund billions in transportation improvements across metro Atlanta began airing on TV stations last week.

The ad makes some bold claims and some even bigger promises, which we decided to put to the test.

The ad claims Atlanta's traffic problems are actually costing the state billions in wasted gas and lost time and productivity.

The ad, which was created and paid for by Citizens for Transportation Mobility, bases its claim on the Texas Traffic Institution annual report. The reports estimates Atlanta's gridlock costs the state and its citizens nearly $2.5 billion annually.

The ad also claims the penny sales tax will spur job creation and strengthen the local economy. The tax would fund more than 150 transportation projects in 10 metro counties. The price tag is an estimated $8 billion.