Our network

Environment

Recycle computers, electronics, metals at Acworth Sports Complex

Recycle computers, electronics, metals at Acworth Sports Complex

ACWORTH, Ga. -- The City of Acworth Parks and Recreation Department is holding their Computer, Electronics and Metal Recycling Day at the Acworth Sports Complex on Saturday.

From 8 a.m. until 5 p.m., the City of Acworth invites community members to recycle household items like grills, lawn mowers, metal patio furniture, car parts, bikes, gutters, metal siding, metal fencing and exercising equipment.

There is no cost to recycle metal and electronics, but computer monitors cost $15 and televisions cost $20 to recycle. As part of the Think Green! program, the City of Acworth hopes to reduce landfill collections.

A new addition to this year's recycling day is that Federal Recyclers will accept paint. Pints and gallons have a fee of $2, five-gallon cans cost $7. They ask that paint cans are labeled because some paints are hazardous waste, and need to be separated for controlled recycling.

15 counties must clean their air

15 counties must clean their air

ATLANTA -- Air Quality Awareness Week recently came to a close, and 15 metro Atlanta counties didn't quite make the clean air cut.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently changed its standards of attainment for ozone standards from .08 parts per billion to .075 parts.

The change means that 15 formerly compliant counties were re-designated at nonattainment for ground-level ozone: Bartow, Cherokee, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, DeKalb, Douglas, Fayette, Forsyth, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, Newton, Paulding and Rockdale.

To clean up the air, residents can try carpooling to work or taking MARTA if possible; fewer cars on the roads means more breathable air for everyone in metro Atlanta.

Learn more about how to reduce emissions and cut down on ozone at www.cleanaircampaign.org.

CTC instructor named 'green' Educator of the Year

CTC instructor named 'green' Educator of the Year

ACWORTH, Ga. -- A horticulture instructor at Chattahoochee Technical College has been named the 2012 Georgia Green Industry Association Educator of the Year.

John Hatfield teaches at the school's North Metro Campus in Acworth.

"I went into education to try to make a difference," Hatfield said. "I wasn't always a big fan of school when I went through it. I said if I ever got the chance to teach, I would try to do it differently. I think I've done my best to make that happen."

Hatfield began teaching at CTC in 1995. He attended Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, the school where his parents met ("It was just understood that I would go there," he said), before earning a degree in landscape architecture from the University of Georgia and starting his own landscape design business. He returned to UGA for the graduate degree that would allow him to teach.

FEMA encourages Chattahoochee-area residents to learn flood risks

FEMA encourages Chattahoochee-area residents to learn flood risks

ATLANTA -- As 2011 draws to a close, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) encourages all Americans to understand the risks that surround them -- and for residents of the Upper Chattahoochee River Region, those risks include the possibility of flooding.

FEMA worked with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources to create maps of the 107-mile stretch of the Chattahoochee River between the Buford Dam and Coweta County, which includes Cobb, Coweta, DeKalb, Douglas, Forsyth, Fulton and Gwinnett counties.

These updated maps detail flood hazard and risk data with the ultimate goal of protecting homeowners from flooding.

Maps for those who live in the Chattahoochee flood region are available at www.georgiadfirm.com. Learn more about steps to prevent flood damage at www.ready.gov/floods.

Girl Scouts Use Cookie Sale Proceeds to Help Local School

Girl Scouts Use Cookie Sale Proceeds to Help Local School

As a service project, Girl Scout Junior Troop 28253 purchased new flowers and decorations to beautify the main entrance at Carmel Elementary School.  They also spent the next day picking up debris, dead-heading plants, and weeding the beds around the school. 

The Troop learned about planting and maintaining flower beds while doing a great project to help the school. 

The girls use proceeds from their cookie sales for service projects throughout the year, this is the 4th time they have planted flowers/bushes at their school.  The girls have also planned a service project for the school library for the holidays, and they will again donate proceeds from their cookie sales towards a service project this spring. 

Girl Scout Junior Troop 28253 is based out of Carmel Elementary and is comprised of 4th and 5th graders. 

Students Learn About Bees-Up Close and Personal

Students Learn About Bees-Up Close and Personal

 

Drought spreads into North Georgia

Drought spreads into North Georgia

ATLANTA -- Georgia's state climatologist says extreme drought conditions have now spread into North Georgia and cover most of the state south of the mountains.

Climatologist David Stooksbury says all of Georgia's counties are now classified as being in moderate, severe or extreme drought.

In his most recent reports on the drought, Stooksbury said the outlook for relief in the short-term is not promising. Unless Georgia sees some tropical weather over the next few months, the state can expect below-normal rainfall and above-normal temperatures.

Without tropical rain, Georgia's soil is expected to continue to dry out. Stream flows, groundwater levels and reservoir levels are expected to continue to drop, and wildfire potentials are expected to remain high to extreme.